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HR Technology Interviews

Data-Driven Job Matching. An Interview with Yarden Tadmor, CEO, Switch

  

The Muse Calls Switch "Tinder for Jobs"

Published on January 20 2015
Yarden Tadmor, CEO Switch - TotalPicture Radio interview with Peter ClaytonYarden Tadmor

"Switch is a job discovery platform for people with jobs, solving the issue of anonymity that every employed job seeker goes through. As an anonymous mobile job marketplace, Switch connects passive job seekers quickly and directly with hiring managers and internal recruiters at companies." Yarden Tadmor

The Catch 22 in job search has always been if you currently HAVE a job... (what recruiters call a "passive candidate)," and you're really good at your current job, you're probably too busy to look for a new job. You certainly don't want to be pitched by recruiters at work, and are worried that if you start looking, your current employer will find out, which could effect promotions, raises, training and perks down the line.

Welcome to TotalPicture Radio! We produce cutting-edge videos, webinars and podcast interviews with a focus on talent acquisition, recruiting, HR Tech, leadership and innovation. Visit our conference and event page on totalpicture.com to learn about TotalPicture Media's unique video and podcast marketing opportunities available at many of the most important conferences - and unconferences thought 2015.

"We are exploring a range of business models, but since Switch is currently in beta. We do not charge employers fees yet."

Welcome to a HR Technology Channel podcast on TotalPicture Radio. This is Peter Clayton. A new group of start-ups are creating stealth apps you can use that, (according to the companies), will protect your identity, but at the same time showcase your background, skills, and experience, letting recruiters and companies know you would be open to new opportunities without exposing your name or current role.

Last week I spoke with Tom Leong at Poachable based in Seattle, (see sidebar for link), today, we'll switch coasts and meet Yarden Tadmor the CEO of Switch, which The Muse clalls "Tinder for Jobs."

Giving Passive Candidates Career Control - Are You Poachable?

  

Ex-Googler and Co-Founder of Poachable, Tom Leung Tells Us How to Look for a New Job Without Looking for a New Job.

Published on January 13 2015
Tom Leung, founder of Poachable interviewed by TotalPicture Radio Tom Leung

"Here's a surprising truth about the job market, circa 2015: For the first time in a while, workers have the upper hand." Rachel Emma Silverman, WSJ

"Going on some job board and just searching for a job feels so 1990," says Tom Leung, Poachable's chief. "Now we can say we know a lot about you, we don't contact you unless we have a match, and we think this particular job is going to be the right fit for you."

Watch the Video Now:

Tom Leung, founder of Poachable, based in Seattle, Washington, joins Peter Clayton for a HR Technology Podcast on TotalPicture Radio, to discuss this new approach to finding, and recruiting high performers. 

The Catch 22 in job search has always been if you currently HAVE a job... (what recruiters call a "passive candidate)," and you're really good at your current job, chances are pretty good you're probably too busy to look for a new job. You certainly don't want to be pitched by recruiters at work, and are worried that if you start looking, your current employer will find out.

Tom Leung TotalPicture Radio Interview Transcript

INTRO: Hi, everyone. Welcome to TotalPicture Radio. We produce cutting edge videos, webinars and podcast interviews with a focus on talent acquisition, recruiting, HR technology, leadership and innovation. Visit our conference and events page, totalpicture.com to learn about TotalPicture media's unique video and podcast marketing opportunities available at many of the most important conferences and on conferences throughout the year. This February, we will be covering a series of Global #HRU and #HRTechTank un-conferences in the US. Please let us know if you'd have an interest in sponsoring the live stream and on-conference highlights videos in New York or Boston. Contact me, Peter Clayton, by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 203-293-7003.

"Here's a surprising truth about the job market circa 2015. For the first time in awhile workers have the upper hand."

That's a quote from an excellent page 1 story by Rachel Emma Silverman in the January 2nd edition of the Wall Street Journal titled -New Year, New Job? Read This First.

Another quote - "Going on some job board and just searching for a job feels so 1990," says Tom Leung, Poachable's chief. "Now we can say we know a lot about you, we don't contact you unless we have a match, and we think this particular job is going to be the right fit for you."

The catch-22 in job search has always been if you currently have a job what recruiters call a passive candidate and you're really good at your current job, chances are pretty good you're probably too busy to be looking for a new job. You certainly don't want to be pitched by recruiters at work and are worried that if you start looking your current employer will find out which could affect promotions, raises, training, perks down the line and other things.

Welcome to an HR technology channel podcast here on TotalPicture Radio. I'm Peter Clayton. A new group of start-ups are creating stealth apps you can use that according to the companies will protect your identity but at the same time showcase your background, skills and expertise letting recruiters and companies know you would be open to new opportunities without exposing your name or current role.

In her page 1 story, Rachel identified four recent start-ups - Poached, Switch, Poachable and Jobr - as solutions currently employed job seekers can use without fear of exposing their interest as solutions current employed job seekers can use without the fear of exposing their interest in pursuing other opportunities to their current employers. Of course, if you're currently unemployed, good luck getting on the radar screen of a recruiter. These apps won't do anything for you or will they?

Today, Tom Leung, founder of Poachable based in Seattle, Washington joins me for an HR technology podcast on TotalPicture Radio to discuss this new approach to finding and recruiting high performers.

Tom, welcome to TotalPicture Radio.

Tom:

Thanks for having me, Peter.

Peter:

All right. So first of all, tell us about you. Give us a brief background.

Tom:

Sure. Well, I first got into tech back in 1999. I was sort of a classic grad school dropout that decided to kind of pursue the dot com riches and then went back to school in 2001 and then went to Microsoft after graduating, finally and that's why I ended up in Seattle and then in the last 12 years I've been in Seattle. I've worked at Microsoft. I worked with one of the early product managers for Google in the Seattle office and then in 2012 I decided to kind of pursue the entrepreneurship path once more and we actually started with a very different idea that kind of pivoted and evolved in a lot of different directions and kind of stumbled upon the idea for Poachable this past summer and it just has taken off really kind of overnight and so we're excited. It's been a fun journey so far.

Peter:

That's great. Actually, there's a really excellent article on Xconomy by Benjamin Romano that's titled - Knowing When To Hold 'Em: The Story of Poachable. So get a little more in depth with this and this whole idea of the pivot that you did last summer and how, you know, I think the story is really interesting and by the way podcast listeners you can find links to all of the things we're going to be talking about today on Tom's feature page in the HR Technology channel of TotalPicture Radio... so give us a little bit of a background because you and your partner had started another company and then, you know, again Seattle is one of those markets where finding tech talent is almost impossible.

Tom:

Yeah. Yeah. I mean, even before I started... we sort of started the entrepreneurship path in 2012. I was a VP of product at a small publicly traded company and had to hire a few dozen people in a few years and I think almost all of them were passive candidates. We just, you know, weren't able to find the people we really wanted through just hitting our career side and applying so I've definitely... and I've been poached too from companies that I've had so I guess I've seen a lot of this and been an active participant in many cases but we started the company with a product called Yabbly and it was a Q&A, a question and answer startup. People call this sort of like a Quora for product research and it was one of those ideas that was good but not great so it always had enough progress that you thought, oh, you know, we're just on the cusp of really breaking through and so we tried that for almost two years and then eventually decided that that just was not growing at the rate we needed it to and pivoted. Our first pivot was from product Q&A to AMA (Ask Me Anything). It's kind of like Reddit AMA's.

So we built this platform that was optimized for that kind of dialogue and interestingly enough, we noticed that there were a lot of hiring managers hosting these AMAs and they would generally be entitled, you know. I'm hiring for my team in Amazon. Ask me anything and we're like, why are all these hiring managers in AMAs?

Peter:

Because they're desperate.

Tom:

I know and they must be really desperate because our AMA platform at that point was about two weeks old, you know. And so, we said, wow, they're actually paying us to promote these AMA's and we don't really have a big audience and so we took that and we didn't quite land on Poachable right away. We actually took that insight and turned it into another product called Jobly, and Jobly was taking the AMA format and trying to replace the onsite interviewing loop. So it would allow you to do asynchronous group interviews with some video integration and we were all excited about that. We were like, okay, we know these hiring managers are really kind of desperate for solutions and now we can take this AMA thing and make it private and there's these annotations and it will help with scheduling, yadda, yadda and no one used it. No one.

Peter:

Well, the only problem was there are about a thousand video interviewing platforms out there.

Tom:

Yeah, that's for sure. And we had some bells and whistles that we thought were really different but ultimately after about a month trying to giveaway Jobly, we finally asked some recruiters like, hey, how come you're not using it and you know, they said, well, interviewing people isn't a problem for us and shame on me as an entrepreneur but it was only until this point that I finally had the humility to say, well, what is their problem? And they all said, finding great candidates especially passive ones is incredibly hard. And so we dug a little deeper there and we found that these recruiters are spending all day long composing emails on LinkedIn and they had to be really customized email so they don't have to take time to research, oh yeah, you went to this school and you used to live here and they were trying to kind of come up with some connection and then they would realize that, you know, the vast majority maybe 90% of those emails would never be responded to and so they were spending all their time basically canvassing the entire addressable market and they didn't know who is open to even making a change and if they were open, who might even be open to a company like theirs?

And then on the other hand, we talked to some people who had recently changed jobs. Actually, I talked to a few software developers who had changed jobs and I interviewed one guy and I said, you're now at... I think he went to Hulu from Amazon and I said, you're a senior backend developer, experienced job a guy and now you're at Hulu and you were at Amazon working on some pretty big stuff, you must have just considered dozens of opportunities since you can have the pick of litter. And the guy said to me, no, actually, I only looked at two and I said well why is that? And he said, well, when I was working I didn't have a lot of time and I didn't want to like apply a formally to all these companies and then risk having the recruiters, former roommate know my current manager and say, hey, did you know that Bob is looking around?

Peter:

Yeah. Exactly.

Tom:

And I also didn't want to take that risk and not even know if anybody would even respond and frankly I haven't updated my résumé in a few years and I ended up at Hulu because my friend worked there and, you know, I got an email from the recruiter and he made the introduction and now I'm here.

Peter:

Well, there you go, man. It's like 33% of new hires are referrals. From people working within the company saying, hey, I've got a great friend over here who's working at Amazon, who's got the skills we're looking for. Let's bring him in.

Tom:

Yeah. And that's the path of least resistance often times for these passive candidates. The sad part is it's not clear that these candidates end up in the best job and best company for them because they're not considering all of the options available. They're kind of artificially constraining their choices and so we kind of put those two insights together and say, well, you know, what if there was a trusted safe third party where we could facilitate very discrete exploration that was also very intelligent and filtered and targeted and of course at this time, you know, Tinder was kind of getting on the action and there's all these interesting anonymous apps for consumers but there wasn't really going on on the employment space so our team said let's give it a try, and it was I think we had maybe six weeks of money left in the bank and so it was a Hail Mary for sure and we were actually about to sell the company to another startup and we ended up getting traction almost right away. People started signing up within days and companies started contacting us within days. So then we went back to the investors and we said, hey, look I know we're supposed to sell the company and it would be an okay outcome for everybody but we really think we're onto something with Poachable and we'd like you to give us more money. And they did.

Within a few days they said we really like this idea, we know that this team is capable of building great products. We've had a horrible track record of finding product market fit, but this time we found some potential product market and so combine with the teams execution capabilities everybody is really excited and so they put some more money in the summer and then we brought on a new investor Vulcan Ventures in December and now we're off to the races and having a lot of fun.

Peter:

Great. Well, let's get in some of the nitty-gritty here. How does Poachable work? Kind of give us a step by step from a job candidates, you know, passive candidates position. What do you need to do to get on Poachable?

Tom:

Yeah. So if you're a member, you basically create a private profile with us. It's free for members.

Peter:

Now, is this an app? Is this a website?

Tom:

It's a web app. So it will work from your laptop. It will work from your mobile phones, mobile browser. Most of the notifications come through email. So it's designed to be really easy to use, not a lot of work but also involved enough that we get the data we need to make good matches. And so the key thing about what we do is that the information you give us is not searchable or browsable by employers. It's only viewable by Poachable and that's crucial because what we find is that our members are willing to share things with us like salary history, salary expectations, companies they would never work at, companies they would be interested in working at and they're not comfortable putting that on a traditional sort of professional networking platform.

Peter:

Right. You know what, I'll put that up on LinkedIn.

Tom:

No. Because you're like, oh, man, what if all of a sudden my colleagues start getting these alert saying, you know, Peter just added 10 skills in his job expectations to LinkedIn, you know, so for Poachable it's very, very discreet. That's like kind of the key thing about us. But because they give us all of this information, we can then really intelligently find jobs and companies that are aligned with what they tell us is important to them and similarly we can then filter further by saying, okay, of that group how many of those people have backgrounds that match what the companies want and when we have that kind of combined match then we notify the member and we say, hey, we think we may have something here. Can you rate it? Kind of like in the old days when you rate your Netflix movies and if you find one particularly intriguing you could say, actually, I'd like to learn more about this one but I would prefer not to reveal myself at this stage and then we would notify the employer. The employer we say, hey, this role that you told us you wanted to promote, we found a bunch of people who we thought would be good fits. One of them just reviewed your description and confirmed interest in learning more. Here is there anonymous bio. Are you still interested in learning about him? And then the employer can say, yes, I am and generally, there's some yes, no screener questions so they know that the person is a viable candidate and if the employer says, yes, I would like to request a reveal and then we go back to the member and we say, hey, you know, that opportunity that you said maybe to the employer and the recruiter for that would like to learn more about you. Now is your big decision. Are you ready to reveal and open the kimono as it where.

Peter:

Right.

Tom:

And if you say yes then we notify the employer, they can see the full profile and then we can facilitate an introduction and thereafter the recruiter kind of takes it and runs with it through their normal process generally a phone screen.

Peter:

Right. Well, you have a really impressive client listing including several of your former employer such as Google and Microsoft so tell us how this works, Tom, from the employer standpoint and I'm assuming that the employers are the ones who put the money up to put their jobs upon your network.

Tom:

Yeah. So all the revenue comes from the employers. So the way it works from the employer point of view is they're generally trying to reach as many candidates as they can and they're finding that there's this population that are not going to be responsive to unsolicited recruiter mail and depending on the job that population could be a majority of the population. So if you're a data scientist in San Francisco, you know, good luck trying to cold email one of those guys.

Peter:

Right. Right.

Tom:

They just have filters on their Gmail. Well, all the archive.

Peter:

Well, to your point also about in mails is that it's the same kind of thing.

Tom:

Yeah. Yeah. And so the recruiters that we work with I think they appreciate Poachable because we basically skip that part for them and take them right to the point where in today's world someone replied to that email because when we notify the employer, they only hear from us when we have someone who we believe is a viable candidate and then where the candidate reviewed their job and showed interest and is sort of warm and ready to learn more.

And the other thing that I think the employers like is that our pricing model is very different. So I guess I've taken some of the experience I had at Google working in performance marketing to say, you know, why should you pay 500 bucks for a job posting and not know what's going to happen. You might get some applicants. Many of whom are not qualified. Maybe we should just charge you when we can deliver results and so for us we only charge you per reveal and so since that is fairly further down in the funnel, you know what you're only going to pay when there's real value being delivered. So I think they like that.

And I think the last piece they like is that we do a lot of the screening for them so that the signal to noise ratio is much higher meaning if you give us a job, we're not going to show that job to 99% of our members because maybe they're not qualified, maybe they're over qualified, maybe they're not open company, you know, whatever and so you don't have to worry about revealing applications from people who kind of have no business applying. So I think from the employer point of view, they appreciate those elements.

Peter:

Right. Right. So from what I understand, Tom, the current focus of Poachable is on software product development teams and developers and designers and product managers specifically in like New York, Seattle and San Francisco, do you have plans this year to expand your geography and perhaps the job categories that you're targeting?

Tom:

Yes. So we started out in the summer of 2014 and now, you know, our beach head has been from a geography point of view New York, San Francisco and Seattle and from a vertical industry point of view technology professionals like you mentioned developers, designers, product managers and marketers. The good news is that the product is really getting more and more mature and more scalable every week and so we anticipate adding new verticals and new geographies this year,2015 and we're already starting to get subtraction in secondary geography markets still for tech jobs but like Chicago, Boston, Austin Texas, Los Angeles and we will be expanding further and that's part of the reason why we've raised a little bit more capital to kind of grow a little faster this year than we had in the last six months.

Peter:

Is there an opportunity for currently unemployed job candidates to benefit from using Poachable?

Tom:

That's a tough one.

Peter:

Yeah.

Tom:

I mean, we do get people signing up who are not employed and we try our best to do matches whenever it makes sense. I guess the way to think about it is one of the key things that we try to do is make viable introductions. And so if someone who applies whether they're employed or unemployed, if they're just not going to get consideration from a recruiter, we actually don't even want to make that match because we're starting to develop data where we can pretty much predict for a particular job and company whether this member is going to be interesting to that company and so for certain companies if there are really high, high demand kind of hot stuff companies so like we have a role that we just added recently for Facebook and they get a lot of interest. It's a cool company and so they're probably going to prioritize people who are employed and they're going to make the assumption that well, if they're employed, wherever they're working, you know, that company seems to think that they're doing a good job and it's not fair to the unemployed people to assume that there are issues but it's just when you have a thousand applicants for a job you have that luxury, right?

I think in the long term, our company vision is really to help everyone be in the right job at the right company for their needs and interests that are a good match and that will include people who currently aren't working but to be fair, that's not our focus right now. I think that's more of a long term thing for us and it may not even be part of the Poachable passive job searching kind of solution. It might be other things that we offer in the job matching space.

Peter:

Right. Right. Yeah, it's really tough for unemployed to compete out there especially in trying to get the attention of recruiters because as you well know recruiters are interested in people who are employed, the passive candidates. That's who they want to present to their hiring managers.

Tom:

Yeah. It's often the safer hire.

Peter:

Absolutely. Yeah.

Tom:

Nobody gets fired for recruiting a Google engineer.

Peter:

No. Exactly.

Tom:

It's like the old day. Nobody gets fired for buying IBM.

Peter:

Right.

Tom:

And so I will say that sometimes, it's not just unemployed but there are passive candidates who are starting to become more active but, you know, kind of sort of passive plus and one of the things I've noticed is that for us folks who are genuinely interested in making a change even if they're currently employed often times their expectations for what they would move for are not quite aligned with what the market is willing to offer. I'll give you an example. You know, there are some members who work at companies and they've done really well there but they want to make a change and they say, well, hey, I've been at such and such company for 12 years. I'm now a director of whatever and I'm making this very large salary but I really want to have a new company but I will only make a change if I'm running the whole group and blah, blah and then they'll say, well, why aren't you giving me more matches? And the challenge is that you might be super valuable in your current company that doesn't necessarily mean you're going to be equally valuable to another company.

So the analogy with the unemployed folks is that sometimes you got to be willing to just get your foot in the door and take a job that maybe you know you would nail and wouldn't be as challenging as your perfect job but you just got to get in there and I guess sometimes people don't help themselves when they say, well, it has to be a VP job or better or I need to be making this much because that's how much I was making before. And I understand why that makes sense intuitively but the challenges the longer you're out of the game, the less leverage you have.

Peter:

Absolutely.

Tom:

And it's sort of like selling your house. If you're going to drop the price, drop it so you're going to get a buyer now. Don't keep dropping it 5% every six months.

Peter:

Exactly. And that is so true and I've seen that over and over again through this recession which fortunately we seem to be pretty much out of now but especially outside of the standard tech jobs and medical jobs and those types of things that have always been in hide to men. You know, people who were VP of whatever just refuse to take anything less and a year later they're still looking and that's not doing anybody any favors.

Tom:

Yeah. And you know what if you're as good as you think you are, if you're a VP now and you have to take a director role or a senior manager role, you'll get promoted if you're that good.

Peter:

Right. Exactly. You know, what I particularly love about Poachable is this is really finally something that job seekers now have a tool that really for the first time gives them the upper hand and some leverage and puts them in the drivers site instead of the company and the recruiter being in the driver seat.

Tom:

Yeah. That's totally true. I think in the old days you either were "loyal" to your company and not even taking the call, you know, hanging up right away when the recruiter called or you are one foot out the door. And the reality is most of us are in the middle. You know, we're not married to our current employer but we're not desperate to make a change and the challenge with that sort of silent majority is that in the past they would have to kind of take this great step and mentally say well I'm now officially looking and what we've tried to do is say, you know what, you don't have to be looking to be informed and to be aware of what's going on out there and to explore opportunities beyond just kind of, you know, searching on the job search site and so what we try to do is say like, hey, you know, why don't we protect your identity and let you take maybe one or two steps with the company and if there's interest on both sides and if you want to keep going, that's great but if not then you haven't lost anything because part of the problem that I think a lot of passive candidates had in the past was they would feel like, oh, well (A) if I apply for a job I'm going to get exposed by my current employer, but (B) if I apply for this job and then I'm turned down now somehow I feel like I'm damaged goods that that employer who I might have had an opportunity with a few years from now.

And so what we've tried to do is say, you know, why don't we make it easier for you to kind of dip your toe in the water and probe while still under the veil of anonymity and then only reveal yourself when you know the recruiters at least open to talking to you again. Because if you send your mail - if you go to some acme.com's career site and submit your résumé and cover letter, you got a lot of risk right now. At that moment you're like, oh man, my current boss is going to find out potentially and then now I might get not even hear back and now I'm in someone ATS as a declined candidate. I've got a lot to lose here.

Peter:

Right.

Tom:

And so in the Poachable world what you do is you just say maybe to Acme, and no one knows that you did it. You only take further action if the company of Acme reciprocates after looking at your anonymous profile. So now you know, okay, if I'm going to reveal at least they want to learn more about me. I'm willing to take that risk now and so I agree with you that the power is shifting from the big company to the talent and another way to look at it is that I think that the market will be more efficient that way and in the long run, a lot of employers that we've talked to when we initially started Poachable were worried like, oh, are they going to be worried that we're a company that facilitates them losing people.

I think a lot of companies are taking a long view on this and saying, you know what, people are going to leave if they're not happy sooner or later. We'd rather have people stay because it's the right thing versus stay because they don't know about other opportunities and then on the other hand we can fill our roles with people who might be a perfect fit who may not be actively on job sites everyday but now because a Poachable we can access that population in a much more efficient way.

Peter:

Right. Right. And let's face it, the whole executive search business has been built on, you know, these recruiters going into companies and selling the top performers on making a change, right?

Tom:

Yeah. My older brother actually owns an executive search firm, so we have some fun Thanksgiving conversations.

Peter:

Sure. Yeah. One last question, I'm really into our conversation today, have you gone some push back from employers from a standpoint of well, you know, you're really like a Trojan horse coming into our company here.

Tom:

You know, we haven't gotten that and I think the closest we've got is some recruiter say, hey, I don't want to see any of my own employees and it's sort of this like they don't want this awkward conversation.

Peter:

Right.

Tom:

And not necessarily because they're worried about sort of losing people and, you know, we explained to them look, that's impossible because we would never match someone with their current employer and secondly the member would have to agree to reveal to their own employer so there's multiple kind of safeguards. I think the approach that employers have taken is to say, this is a tool that my competitors are starting to use. If I don't use this and I just used one source for passive candidates, I'm going to be missing out and secondly, if my current employees are not happy they're probably not performing well either, it's the manager's job to keep them kind of satisfied and challenged and if they're not doing that then they're going to end up leaving regardless.

So we haven't had that issue where, you know, a company says we only want to use you. We don't want our employees to use you. We haven't had that yet. I think people just understand. And in some ways maybe LinkedIn broke some ground here because everybody recruits using LinkedIn and they know their employees are often recruited or introduced to people through that platform so we're not the first one to sort of take this agnostic kind of objective route.

Peter:

How can people connect with you, Tom and how can people learn more about Poachable?

Tom:

Oh, that's great. Yes, so they can hit our website anytime poachable.co.

Peter:

Which is CO, right?

Tom:

Yup. That's right. They can follow us on Twitter @poachable. If they want to follow me I'm @toml and yeah we're always open to feedback and love engaging with people and learning more and for employers, there's a free trial so your first three introductions are free and then after that you can decide if you want to continue or not and if you didn't there would be no further obligation so we try to make it really easy for companies to start using us.

Peter:

Great. Well, it's really been fun to have this opportunity to speak with you today and it looks like the Hail Mary really worked. You got a homerun here or a touchdown or whatever you want to call it.

Tom:

Well, yeah, we're hopeful. Our office is not too far from the Seahawks, so I think that rubbed off on us.

Peter:

Well, I look forward to continuing the conversation and staying connected with you.

Tom:

Thanks Peter. It was great talking to you.

Peter:

Thank you. Good talking to you.

We've been speaking with Tom Leung, CEO of Poachable. That's poachable.co. You'll find the video version of this interview on Tom's show page in the HR technology channel of TotalPicture Radio that's totalpicture.com. While there please sign up for our newsletter, subscribe to your iTunes channel and join the conversation on our Facebook group TotalPicture Radio. You can connect with Tom on Twitter @toml and @poachable. Follow me @peterclayton and @totalpicture. Thanks so much for tuning in today. I look forward to hearing your thoughts, ideas and comments. Have a great week.

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Predictive Analytics Takes Center Stage at the HR Technology Conference

  

Predictive Analytics: Say it Once, Say it Twice. According to Bill Kutik you'll be saying it a lot in 2015 if you're in HR or recruiting

Premiers on January 02 2015
Bill Kutik - HR Executive Online columnist -TotalPicture Radio interviewBill Kutik

"Predictive analytics is an area of data mining that deals with extracting information from data and using it to predict trends and behavior patterns. Often the unknown event of interest is in the future, but predictive analytics can be applied to any type of unknown whether it be in the past, present or future.
" Wikipedia

Joining Peter Clayton in this special vodcast/podcast to discuss the past, present and future of HR technology (and predictive analytics in particular) is our good friend Bill Kutik - whose headline in a recent Human Resource Executive article was Predictive Analytics Dominates My First HR Tech Conference.

Bill Kutik is considered the leading independent analyst of the HR technology marketplace with specialties in HCM, Recruiting, Talent Management and social networking.

Since 1990, he has been Technology Columnist for Human Resource Executive® (and for HREOnline™ since 2006,), also serving as co-chairman of the magazine's famous annual conference, HR Technology® Conference & Exhibition, since it began in 1998. In 2008, he started The Bill Kutik Radio Show®, a bi-weekly online talk show with industry leaders.

HR World named him one of "The Top 25 HR Influencers of 2007." More recently, he was named a "Top 25 HR Digital Influencer 2009" and a "Top 100 Influencer."

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Insights From a Savvy HR Tech Investor

  

Taras Polischuk, Talent Equity Ventures (TEqV) Shares His Strategies for Investing in HR Tech, and Predictions for 2015

Published on December 22 2014
Taras Polischuk, HR Tech Investor, interviewed by Peter Clayton -TotalPicture Radio Taras Polischuk

"It all comes down to the areas in the industry where HR Tech can actually add value. There are around 500 investment opportunities that I have evaluated in the last two years. However, most of these products' main problem is that they are a point solution; and are solving a very small part of the bigger problem that customers experience. What clients want is to buy a solution, not a product. They want a platform, and they are ready to pay premium for having it, for getting rid of their pain." Taras Polischuk

Happy Holidays! It's that time of year folks... everyone in our space is making predictions for HR Tech in 2015. Our special guest today is Taras Polischuk an investment professional in HR Tech, uniquely qualified to weigh-in on this topic. Taras wrote an excellent article on the SmartRecruiters Blog titled 4 Pillars to the Future of HR Technology -- (see the sidebar for the link to this, and other articles relating to our conversation today). This is great advice for those working in HR Tech, and those evaluating HR Tech products for their organizations.

Welcome to a special HR Technology podcast on TotalPicture Radio with Peter Clayton, in New York City to speak with Taras Polischuk. He works at Talent Equity Ventures, an HR tech-focused Venture Capital firm. He is a strategic advisor at Talent Tech Labs, (where we recorded this interview), a New York-based incubator for Talent Acquisition Technology companies. Taras is co-owner of Global #HRU, the co-organizer of HRTechTank, and a contributor to the SmartRecruiters Blog.

The Big HCM Race to the Cloud

  

Bill Kutik provides expert analysis on the hyper-competitive enterprise HR systems battleground

Published on October 03 2014
Bill Kutik - HR Executive Online columnist -TotalPicture Radio interviewBill Kutik

"The draft of the 17th-annual Sierra-Cedar (formerly CedarCrestone) definitive HR Systems Survey projects that, by next year, the number of organizations running cloud Core HR systems will overtake those running licensed, on-premise or hosted systems. The managers of the survey quickly concede it may take longer as organizations rarely change as rapidly as they plan." Bill Kutik

Bill is Back! Bill Kutik returns to TotalPicture Radio to discuss his Tech Trends feature article in the October issue of Human Resource Executive Magazine, and HRE Online titled Second Turn of the HCM Horse Race, (see sidebar for link) - an in-depth article that zeros in on the big three in enterprise HCM systems - Oracle, SAP/Success Factors and Workday. Welcome to a HR Technology Channel video and podcast on TotalPicture Radio. Joining Peter Clayton, of course is Bill Kutik, HR Technology Columnist and leading independent industry analyst - Bill is co-chair emeritus of the 17th Annual HR Technology® Conference & Expo, and a frequent contributor to TotalPicture Radio.

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